The Call: Top 5 headlines in March 2020

The Call: Top 5 headlines in March 2020

What a difference a month makes


At the beginning of March, we were fretting about General Conference, clicking on stories about new denominations. We were mobilizing to help our neighbors in central Tennessee as they assessed the damage from a deadly tornado.
 
Within days, our churches were closed. General Conference and hundreds of other meetings were canceled or postponed. We were using words over and over that most of us had never used before: Quarantine. Pandemic. Social distancing.
 
Instead of fighting over the Bible or the Book of Discipline, we are suddenly fighting to stay home so that others can fight to save our lives.
 
Yet the church in Holston Conference is alive in ways that we could have never foreseen, as your stories and the stories to come will attest.
 
If clicks are votes, the following stories and reports were the most-read by our subscribers in this month's weekly editions of The Call.
 
1.  Holstonians rise with solutions after closures 
 
As news of the coronavirus pandemic grows more alarming, pastors and members of Holston’s 864 churches seem to accept they'll be away from their beloved congregations and sanctuaries for a longer period than first anticipated. (March 19) Read the story.
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2. Bishop Taylor closes churches indefinitely 
 
To the shock of many, on March 13 Bishop Taylor mandated a two-week closing of Holston churches for public worship to help slow the spread of coronavirus. Not many were surprised March 18 when she shuttered church buildings "until further notice," following the lead of public health officials. (March 13) Read the announcements.
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3. Holston prepares to help neighbors after tornado
 
Mission leaders are reaching out to United Methodists in central Tennessee to learn how they can help after this week's deadly tornadoes. Death and damage were reported in Putnam, Wilson, Davidson and Benton Counties. (March 4) Read the story.
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4. Finding a need and filling it with love
 
Macy Mitchell was inspired to begin a new ministry when her 83-year-old grandfather admitted he was depressed. Here's what this member at Bearden UMC is doing to bless quarantined senior citizens and families. From The Call to Cook. (March 22) Read the blog.
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5. Churches gain new vision during pandemic
 
The buildings may be closed, but the church is alive in Holston Conference. Members are rallying to share worship, communion, encouragement, food, face masks, and other expressions of love in a world changed by coronavirus. (March 26) Read the story.
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